Search this gallery

*

    

Download media objects

Select the objects to download. If you select an album, all items in the album are included. A ZIP file will be created that contains your objects. If you choose a large number of items, be patient while the ZIP file is built.

Select media size:

Check / uncheck all

Invertebrates

Seabirds

Remote Sensing

The Marine Mammal and Turtle Division (MMTD) conducts applied research on cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) and pinnipeds (seals and sea lions) of the Pacific Ocean. We are guided by the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act; accordingly, our research is designed to aid in the management and conservation of these protected species. The geographic focus of this work at MMTD is on the Pacific Ocean (in particular, the Eastern Tropical Pacific, the Pacific Islands, and the California Current). 

MMTD conducts surveys to study marine mammals within their ecosystems.  These research surveys are conducted from various platforms, including ships, aircraft, and shore-based stations.  The majority of the photos in this collection are taken during these surveys. For more information on marine mammal research in the Division, please visit the MMTD website.

 Screensavers of SWFSC images can be downloaded from the Screensavers page.

For images of marine mammals in the Southern Ocean, please visit the Antarctic 25th Anniversary Photo Collection.

The Advanced Survey Technologies Program (AST) is part of the Fisheries Resources Division (FRD) at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC). AST supports ecosystem-based fisheries management through new or innovative uses of sampling technologies. AST's strategy is to first characterize measurement and sampling uncertainties, and define gaps in existing data; and then develop, refine, and employ advanced survey technologies to improve the accuracy, precision and efficiency of fisheries surveys and thus resulting stock assessments. Examples of advanced survey technologies include: instrumented buoys, instrumented small craft, and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV).FRD is also home to the Benthic Resources Program, which uses a remotely operated vehicle to monitor the status of several species, but primarily endangered white and black abalone, off the coast of the western United States.

In the Field

The Fisheries Resources Division's shark research focuses on Pacific Ocean sharks, with special emphasis on the highly migratory pelagic species: shortfin mako, blue shark and thresher shark. These large, powerful sharks inhabit the mid to surface layers of the ocean, migrating long distances and entering catches of various fisheries throughout their vast ranges, including fisheries within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone. Researchers are studying Pacific sharks to learn more about their biology, distribution, movements, stock structure and status, and potential vulnerability to fishing pressure. This information is provided to international, national and regional fisheries conservation and management bodies charged with ensuring that shark populations remain at sustainable levels.
For more information visit the Large Pelagics Program of the Fisheries Resources Division.

Photographs of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus), other animals and SWFSC gray whale researchers taken from either the Piedras Blancas, CA, the Granite Canyon, CA, or the Sakhalin Island, Russia field stations.

Ichthyoplankton are the eggs and larvae of fish and invertebrates found mainly in the upper 200 meters of the water column, also called the near-surface waters. The eggs are passive and drift in the ocean along with the water currents. Most fish larvae have almost no swimming ability initially, however by half way through their development they are active swimmers. Ichthyoplankton are a relatively small but vital component of total zooplankton. They feed on smaller plankton and are prey themselves for larger animals. It is important to study ichthyoplankton because the abundances of eggs and larvae of several species have been demonstrated to be a good indicators of the transient spawning population size of the adults. The Fisheries Resources Division houses one of the foremost ichthyoplankton ID laboratories in the world. Researchers visit from around the globe to look at the collection, to verify or compare their samples with ours, and to receive training on ichthyoplankton identification from our world class experts. Their job is to sort, identify, measure, and count the ichthyoplankton collected during SWFSC's research surveys. They routinely identify eggs and larvae from the eastern, central, and tropical Pacific.

Fishes

Marine debris is a global concern that pollutes the world's oceans, coming in a variety of forms from discarded soda bottles to derelict fishing gear. SWFSC researchers have observed several instances of marine debris on the seafloor while surveying fish populations and habitats from manned submersibles and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). Reviewing archived video of these observations allows us to quantify information on sources, materials, and impacts of the debris.


- Marine debris research (Habitat Ecology Team)
- Marine debris map and images (Benthic Resources Group)
- Keepers of the Deep (marine debris research video)
- NOAA Marine Debris Program

Since 1986, NOAA's Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division (AERD) has provided ecosystem-based research to the U.S. government for the conservation and sustainable management of Antarctic fisheries.
The AERD mission requires extensive field work, both at field stations and aboard ships, which has been managed through the Antarctic Marine Living Resources (AMLR) Program for over 25 years. Through the years, scientists collecting data in the field have also amassed a collection of images that are unique, stunning, and educational.
Photos found in this album are from the Antarctic Peninsula region, showcasing the three AMLR camps, the research vessels, some of the more than 300 scientists involved in this program through its history, and the many species of predator and prey that live in the area.

The Marine Mammal and Turtle Division (MMTD) conducts applied research on marine turtles of the Pacific Ocean. We are guided by the Endangered Species Act; accordingly, our research is designed to aid in the management and conservation of these protected species. The geographic focus of this work at MMTD is on the Pacific Ocean (in particular, the Eastern Tropical Pacific, the Pacific Islands, and the California Current). 

MMTD conducts surveys to study marine turtles within their ecosystems.  These research surveys are conducted from various platforms, including ships, aircraft, and shore-based stations.  The majority of the photos in this collection are taken during these surveys. For more information on marine turtle research in the Division, please visit the MMTD website.

 Screensavers of SWFSC images can be downloaded from the Screensavers page.

For images of marine mammals in the Southern Ocean, please visit the Antarctic 25th Anniversary Photo Collection.

At Sea