Search this gallery

*

    

Download media objects

Select the objects to download. If you select an album, all items in the album are included. A ZIP file will be created that contains your objects. If you choose a large number of items, be patient while the ZIP file is built.

Select media size:

Check / uncheck all

The Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division (AERD) has run the land-based operations of the Antarctic Marine Living Resources (AMLR) Program out of three field research stations since 1986.
The Seal Island field station was built in 1988 and ran through 1999. When the camp was closed in favor of a new field station at Cape Shirreff, where more predator species could be monitored from a single site, the entire camp was deconstructed and removed from the island, leaving no trace of the scientists who had been there.
The Cape Shirreff field station was founded on Livingston Island in 1997 to replace the Seal Island field station. At this station, still active today, AMLR scientists monitor three penguin and four pinniped species, as well as daily weather, from October to March each year.
The Copacabana field station has existed on King George Island since the mid 1970s as a collaborative effort between the National Science Foundation and NOAA. In 1999, AMLR took over the administration of the Copacabana field camp. Two penguin species are monitored at this site, as well as three other species of seabird, and pinniped population counts are maintained during each breeding season.

Since 1986, the Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division (AERD) has completed vessel-based research in the area surrounding the South Shetland Islands, Elephant Island, the South Orkney Islands, and the Antarctic Peninsula on four ships.
The RV Surveyor was a NOAA ship, used by the Antarctic Marine Living Resources (AMLR) Program from 1989-1995.
The RV Yuzhmorgeologiya was a Russian vessel contracted by the AMLR Program from 1996 through 2009.
The RV Moana Wave was contracted in 2010, and is still in use today.

Field Work

Antarctic Fishes

The Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division (AERD) studies predator population success to monitor the effects of Antarctic fisheries on the ecosystem. As part of their research, scientists in the Antarctic Marine Living Resources (AMLR) Program monitor the breeding biology, foraging ecology and overall population trends of gentoo penguins, a major predator of Antarctic krill.

Chinstrap Penguins

Adelie Penguins

Antarctic Seabirds and Other Penguins

Antarctic Pinnipeds

Leopard Seals

The Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division (AERD) studies predator population success to monitor the effects of Antarctic fisheries on the ecosystem. As part of their research, scientists in the Antarctic Marine Living Resources (AMLR) Program conducted annual censuses on Southern Elephant Seals.

Antarctic Fur Seals

Landscapes

Antarctic Faces Through The Years

Antarctic Icebergs

Equipment Used In Antarctica

Antarctic Invertebrates

Dolphins and Whales