Landscape Ecology Team

Big Creek, Monterey CountyWe are a team of ecologists and geographers working to elucidate the linkages between habitat and anadromous fish that spawn in California. Our approach to this uses principles and methods from landscape, ecosystem, community, and population ecology. One aspect of our research is documentation of spatial and temporal patterns in biota and the environment. Observed patterns lead to hypotheses that we test with experimental manipulations or carefully designed observational studies. Provisionally validated hypotheses are formulated as models that make spatial predictions, in the form of maps. We then test these predictions with further observations, and revise hypotheses accordingly. To do all this, we use field surveys, remote sensing, GIS, field experiments, capture-recapture studies, and statistical modeling in various combinations. Our work seeks to explain how and why fish populations have declined in the past, and to guide restoration efforts in the future.

Team members

Research activities

News

Recent publications

  • Electronic tagging of green sturgeon reveals population structure and movement among estuaries
    (View document on publisher's siteThe previous link is a link to Non-Federal government web site. Click to review NOAA Fisheries disclaimer, subscription may be required.)
    Lindley, Steven T., Daniel L. Erickson, Mary L. Moser, Greg Williams, Olaf P. Langness, Barry W. McCovey Jr., Michael Belchik, Dave Vogel, William Pinnix, John T. Kelly, Joseph C. Heublein, and A. Peter Klimley. 2011. Electronic tagging of green sturgeon reveals population structure and movement among estuaries. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 140(1):108-122.
  • Spatiotemporal patterns in migration timing of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) smolts in North America
    (View document on publisher's siteThe previous link is a link to Non-Federal government web site. Click to review NOAA Fisheries disclaimer, subscription may be required.)
    Spence, Brian C., and James D. Hall. 2010. Spatiotemporal patterns in migration timing of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) smolts in North America. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 67(8):1316-1334.
  • Estimating the size of steelhead runs by tagging juveniles and monitoring migrants
    (View document on publisher's siteThe previous link is a link to Non-Federal government web site. Click to review NOAA Fisheries disclaimer, subscription may be required.)
    Boughton, David A. 2010. Estimating the size of steelhead runs by tagging juveniles and monitoring migrants. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 30(1):89-101.
  • Using dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) to estimate adult steelhead escapement in the San Lorenzo River, California
    Pipal, Kerrie, Mark Jessop, David Boughton, and Peter Adams. 2010. Using dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) to estimate adult steelhead escapement in the San Lorenzo River, California. California Fish and Game 96(1):90-95.

Resources

Technical recovery planning for West Coast salmonids
The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) developed scientifically based viability criteria for Evolutionarily Significant Units (ESUs) of anadromous salmonids listed as Endangered or Threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Pictures

Scanning a juvenile steelhead Snorkel survey

Last modified: 12/24/2014