Fisheries Ecology Division

Santa Cruz LabLocated at the western edge of Santa Cruz, California on the coastal bluff at Terrace Point, the Fisheries Ecology Division joins the adjacent UC Santa Cruz's Long Marine Laboratory and a growing complex of marine research facilities at this site.

Research is focused on Pacific coast groundfish and Pacific salmon. Groundfish under study include rockfishes, flatfishes, Pacific whiting, sablefish, and lingcod; salmon include coho, chinook, and steelhead. Results of this research are used by the Pacific Fishery Management Council to manage fisheries and by NMFS to manage threatened and endangered species. Fisheries Ecology Division scientists study causes of variability in abundance and health of fish populations, analyze ecological relations in marine communities, and study the economics of exploiting and protecting natural resources. They also assess the stocks of species targeted by various fisheries, and assist in evaluating potential impacts of human activities on threatened or endangered species.

Please use the left-side menu to learn more about the SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division.

Division News

Fishermen See ‘Science in Action’ Aboard NOAA Survey Ship

Each spring and early summer, scientists set out along the West Coast aboard NOAA vessel Reuben Lasker to survey coastal pelagic species, or CPS, which includes small schooling fish such as northern anchovy, Pacific sardine, and jack and Pacific mackerels. 

Tracking Antarctic penguins using chemical signatures

NOAA Fisheries researchers are tracking Antarctic penguins using chemical signatures read more here.

New NOAA Fisheries Research Reveals Ecosystem Cascades Affecting Salmon

Researchers found that the common murre, a small ocean seabird, can make a difference in the number of salmon that survive to return as adults, especially when ocean conditions cause the murres to feed primarily on salmon and anchovy.

Rare San Diego Sighting of False Killer Whales

False killer whales observed off La

SWFSC Researcher's Work on Coral Reef Fish Featured on the Cover of the Journal PNAS

Behavioral studies on coral reef fish found that the fish base their decisions to feed on algae or flee from predators on the density and actions of other fish in the area.