Fisheries Ecology Division

Santa Cruz LabLocated at the western edge of Santa Cruz, California on the coastal bluff at Terrace Point, the Fisheries Ecology Division joins the adjacent UC Santa Cruz's Long Marine Laboratory and a growing complex of marine research facilities at this site.

Research is focused on Pacific coast groundfish and Pacific salmon. Groundfish under study include rockfishes, flatfishes, Pacific whiting, sablefish, and lingcod; salmon include coho, chinook, and steelhead. Results of this research are used by the Pacific Fishery Management Council to manage fisheries and by NMFS to manage threatened and endangered species. Fisheries Ecology Division scientists study causes of variability in abundance and health of fish populations, analyze ecological relations in marine communities, and study the economics of exploiting and protecting natural resources. They also assess the stocks of species targeted by various fisheries, and assist in evaluating potential impacts of human activities on threatened or endangered species.

Please use the left-side menu to learn more about the SWFSC Fisheries Ecology Division.

Division News

Aerial images document the final months of J2, an iconic Southern Resident killer whale

John.Durban@noaa.gov, 03 Jan 2017 Our colleagues at the Center for Whale Research (CWR)

Scientists Improve Predictions of How Temperature Affects the Survival of Fish Embryos

Fisheries Ecology Division and UC Santa Cruz researchers found the thermal tolerance of Chinook salmon embryos in the Sacramento River is much lower than expected from laboratory studies. Exploring the cause of this discrepancy led to new insights into how egg size and water flow affect the survival of fish eggs.

New Forecast Tool Helps Ships Avoid Blue Whale Hotspots

New forecast tool helps ships avoid blue whale hotspots

California Leatherback Day Celebration at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center

The powerful leatherback turtle swims 6,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean to feed on jellyfish that are abundant along the California coast during summer and fall months. As many as 300 of these trans ocean travelers visit the California coastline