Antarctic Killer Whale Research Featured in Upcoming TV Series

Discovery's television series "Frozen Planet" features research and field work recently performed by Southwest Fisheries Science Center scientists Bob Pitman and John Durban.

Visit http://dsc.discovery.com/tv/frozen-planet/ The previous link is a link to Non-Federal government web site. Click to review NOAA Fisheries Disclaimerto learn more and watch video, including that of the cooperative hunting behavior of Antarctic killer whales The previous link is a link to Non-Federal government web site. Click to review NOAA Fisheries Disclaimer

"From the makers of Planet Earth and Life, Frozen Planet is the ultimate portrait of our earth's polar regions, where the scale and beauty of the scenery and sheer power of the natural elements are unlike anywhere else on the planet.
A co-production of Discovery Channel and the BBC, and narrated by award-winning actor Alec Baldwin, Frozen Planet premieres on Sunday, March 18, at 8PM e/p."

KW hunting

Photo by: John Durban, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

 

Learn more about SWFSC Antarctic killer whale research

Antarctic killer whale cooperative hunting behavior

Tracking killer whales 



Related Press
Chill and thrill to Discovery's 'Frozen Planet'/By FRAZIER MOORE, AP Television Writer
(03-14) 04:31 PDT New York (AP) --"The best stories on our planet are natural ones," says Alastair Fothergill. But you'd expect him to say that. For two decades with the BBC, Fothergill has produced wildlife documentary series including "Planet Earth,""Blue Planet" and, back in 1993, "Life in the Freezer," which explored Antarctica in all its frigid wonder.
Read moreThe previous link is a link to Non-Federal government web site. Click to review NOAA Fisheries Disclaimer


Mysteries of Killer Whales Uncovered in the Antarctic The previous link is a link to Non-Federal government web site. Click to review NOAA Fisheries Disclaimer

by Fen Montaigne 
Yale Environment 360 
Two of the world’s leading experts [Southwest Fisheries Science Center scientists Robert Pitman and John Durban] on the world’s top marine predator are now in Antarctica, tagging and photographing a creature whose remarkably cooperative hunting behavior and transmission of knowledge across generations may be rivaled only by humans.