EEZ Mammals and Acoustics Staff

EEZ Mammals and Acoustics home page

Amy Van Cise
Graduate Student
Phone: (858) 546-5648
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: avancise@ucsd.edu

The integrative study of evolutionary ecology of cetaceans, understanding the role of social structure in evolution, the effect of cetacean-human interactions on cetacean ecology. Also interested in effective science communication and the politics of managing today’s environmental issues, such as bycatch, overfishing and climate change.

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Anita Gilles
Marine Ecologist
Phone: (858) 546-7051
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: Anita.Gilles@noaa.gov

I have been awarded a Feodor Lynen Research Fellowship by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany, to promote my academic collaborative network while conducting research in the MMTD. My Humboldt research project is interdisciplinary and includes habitat-based density modelling of cetacean line-transect data, a Bayesian approach to trend analysis as well as quantifying threats from human activities. My main research interests cover various aspects of the biology, ecology, monitoring and conservation of marine mammals, such as a) abundance estimation and development of new field methods; b) analysis of spatio-temporal distribution and habitat usage; c) quantitative models of cetacean habitat identifying oceanographic drivers; d) examining the legal regime governing the conservation of marine mammals in the European seas as well as e) feeding ecology and f) interactions with human activities (e.g. fisheries or construction of offshore wind farms). I am also actively involved in providing scientific policy advice to the German Ministries and Agencies on their obligations in agreements and advisory bodies (e.g. European Union Habitats Directive & Marine Strategy Framework Directive) and am a nationally invited expert for the most relevant advisory committees for research and conservation of cetaceans in the EU, such as ASCOBANS (Agreement on the Conservation of Small Cetaceans of the Baltic, North East Atlantic, Irish and North Seas) and ICES.

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Beth Jaime
Scientist II
Phone: 858-334-2832
Fax:
E-mail: Beth.Jaime@noaa.gov

Channel Islands Pinniped Photogrammetry

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Eiren Jacobson
Graduate Student SIO
Phone: 858-546-7184
Fax:
E-mail: Eiren.Jacobson@noaa.gov

I am currently a graduate student in Biological Oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. I am broadly interested in quantitative approaches to cetacean population studies using new techniques and technologies. Currently, I am working closely with researchers at the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center to develop a passive acoustic monitoring network for harbor porpoises in central California. I hope that this network will be capable of monitoring harbor porpoise population trends along the U.S. West Coast.

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Elizabeth Becker
Research Biologist
Phone: (805) 680-3374
Fax:
E-mail: ebecker77@cox.net

Predictive habitat-based models of cetacean density and distribution, with emphasis on the use of remotely sensed and modeled ocean data.

Multi-covariate line-transect abundance estimation.

Statistical techniques in marine ecological research.

Marine species risk assessment and management.

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Eric Keen
Phone: (858) 546-7000
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: ekeen@ucsd.edu

Coastal ecology of marine mammals and seabirds, particularly in fjord systems. Dissertation work is focused on fin whales in the Kitimat Fjord System, northern British Columbia, in collaboration with the Gitga'at First Nation, Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the North Coast Cetacean Society. Thesis website: www.rvbangarang.wordpress.com

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Jay Barlow
Phone: (858) 546-7178
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: Jay.Barlow@noaa.gov

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Jeffrey E. Moore
Research Wildlife Biologist
Phone: (858) 546-7161
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: Jeff.E.Moore@noaa.gov

Research Interests:

Jeff has been with the Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Division since 2010 and became leader of the EMAP Program in 2015. His primary expertise includes quantitative ecology, population dynamics and risk assessment. In his time with MMTD, he has developed and applied Bayesian methods for estimating marine mammal abundance, trends and other demographic parameters; quantifying population impacts of bycatch on sea turtles and marine mammals; conducting risk assessments for protected species; and developing quantitative decision tools to for policy and management. He has also worked on international small-scale fisheries bycatch issues. Jeff serves on advisory committees such as the IUCN Cetacean Specialist Group, the Biological Review Team for reviewing the status of northeastern Pacific white sharks, and the expert statistical panel for analysis of vaquita monitoring data. He regularly contributes to protected species management processes such as updating the Guidelines for Marine Mammal Stock Assessments, Take Reduction Planning, and Pacific Fishery Management Council-related activities. He has authored ~40 peer-reviewed scientific journal articles since 2004 in addition to numerous NOAA agency and IWC technical reports.

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Jennifer Keating
Research Biologist
Phone: (858) 334-2860
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: Jennifer.Keating@noaa.gov

Cetacean bioacoustics, beaked whale acoustic detection and localization, acoustic line-transect surveys, and array building.

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Jim Carretta
Research Fishery Biologist
Phone: (858) 546-7171
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: Jim.Carretta@noaa.gov

Machine Learning

Fishery Bycatch and Mortality

Line-Transect Abundance Estimation

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K. Alexandra Curtis
Research Biologist
Phone: (858) 546-5625
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: Alex.Curtis@noaa.gov

My research focuses on how we can apply quantitative approaches to use existing information more effectively for better management of marine resources. For the past five years, I have been working on development, synthesis, and application of limit reference point estimators (i.e., tools to estimate how much added mortality a population can sustain), with a focus on marine turtles (and other marine megafauna that violate the assumptions underlying the Potential Biological Removal estimator for marine mammals). In the past, I have worked on developing ecosystem indicators for fisheries, improving characterization of uncertainty in ichthyoplankton (fish eggs and larvae) data, and using physical oceanographic data to better estimate abundance of ichthyoplankton. My interests have been shaped in part by several years spent working at the science-policy interface, first as a AAAS Science and Technology Fellow at the U.S. Department of State in 2005-2007, then as a scientist working on sustainable fisheries policy at an environmental NGO in Halifax, Canada.

My research interests include: fisheries and ecosystem management, assessment of fisheries impacts on marine megafauna, biological and physical control of spatial and temporal pattern in marine populations and communities, and characterization of uncertainty.

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Karin Forney
Research Biologist
Phone: (831) 420-3908
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: Karin.Forney@noaa.gov

Since 1987, I have conducted research on the abundance, distribution, ecology, and status of over 25 species of cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) in the eastern and central North Pacific Ocean, with emphasis on small cetaceans. I have also collaborated on studies of endangered leatherback turtles off California. My research interests include 1) oceanographic variability and its effect on the abundance and distribution of cetaceans and other marine vertebrates, 2) habitat-based predictive modeling of cetacean density and distribution, 3) monitoring and mitigating impacts of human-caused mortality and injury on protected species, and 4) quantitative methods for estimating marine animal abundance and evaluating population trends. Additional responsibilities include writing or co-authoring annual Stock Assessment Reports for Pacific Marine Mammal Stocks under NMFS jurisdiction, and conducting field research in small aircraft and aboard oceanographic research vessels.

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Mark S. Lowry
Research Biologist
Phone: (858) 546-7174
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: Mark.Lowry@noaa.gov

Aerial photographic censuses of pinnipeds

California sea lion diets

Identification of fish from otoliths

Identification of cephalopods from beaks

Monitoring pinniped populations

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Shannon Rankin
Wildlife Research Biologist
Phone: (858) 546-7072
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: Shannon.Rankin@noaa.gov

My interests are in using passive acoustic monitoring (otherwise known as listening) of marine mammals to better understand their behavior, populations, and ecology. My work has primarily used towed hydrophone arrays during shipboard line-transect surveys to study odontocetes, and sonobuoys to study mysticetes. I've worked in surveys throughout the north and central Pacific Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico.

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Stephanie Nehasil
Laboratory Technician
Phone: (858) 546-7181
Fax: (858) 546-7003
E-mail: Stephanie.Nehasil@noaa.gov

• Marine mammal ecology and conservation

• Ecosystem-based management

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