Landscape Ecology Team Staff

Landscape Ecology Team home page

Nate Mantua  Leader
Landscape Ecology Team Leader
Phone: (831) 420-3923
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: nate.mantua@noaa.gov

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Alex McHuron
Laboratory Assistant
Phone: (831) 420-3902
Fax:
E-mail: alex.mchuron@noaa.gov

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Amy Smith
Phone: (831) 420-3665
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: amy.smith@noaa.gov

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Andrew Pike
Phone: (831) 420-3992
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: andrew.pike@noaa.gov

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Brian Spence
Phone: (831) 420-3902
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: brian.spence@noaa.gov

I am interested in the interactions between anadromous salmonids and their environments across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. My current research focuses on adaptive variation in the timing of key life-history events of Pacific salmon, examining factors that determine favorable "windows of opportunity" for migrating between habitats used at different life stages, as well as the environmental cues that prompt movement between these habitats. Ongoing projects include analysis of geographic variation in the timing of outmigration by coho salmon smolts and modeling of environmental variables that both initiate smoltification and trigger downstream movement. I am also interested in the influence of land-use and water-use practices on salmonids and their habitats, as well as development of methods for monitoring the presence/absence of aquatic species that are rare or highly patchy in their distributions.

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Brian Wells
Phone: (831) 420-3969
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: brian.wells@noaa.gov

Generally, I quantify the relationships between vital rates of fishes, environmental conditions, and fishing practices with the intent of using this information for improved management. Before relocating to the West Coast, I worked extensively along the East Coast as a researcher and manager. As a researcher, my work related to modeling movement rates, maturation, fidelity, and mortality of coastal fishes (e.g. black drum, weakfish, striped bass, Atlantic salmon). This work involved developing and extending techniques in tagging (Jiang et al. 2007, NAJFM), otolith microchemistry (Wells et al CJFAS 2001, 2003; Wells et al TAFS 2000; Wells et al. MEPS 2003), and fisheries stock assessment (Jones and Wells Fish. Bull. 1998, 2001). I also served on the ASMFC as a stock assessment biologist for the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

The experiences I gained on the East Coast made my transition to West Coast research and management relatively simple. During 2003-2007 my research developed new methods for determining the role of environmental variation of growth, maturation, and survival of important salmon species (Wells et al Fish. Ocean. 2006,2007,2008) and ecosystem dynamics (Wells et al. MEPS 2008). These works also demonstrate methodology for including environmental variables into fishery forecast models.

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Colin Nicol
Laboratory Assistant
Phone: (831) 420-3918
Fax:
E-mail: colin.nicol@noaa.gov

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Colleen Petrik
Assistant Project Scientist
Phone: (831) 420-3946
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: colleen.petrik@noaa.gov

My background is in biological oceanography and ecology. My interest is in understanding how the physical environment mediates the transport, survival, recruitment, and connectivity of zooplankton, ichthyoplankton, and commercially harvested fish and invertebrate species. Furthermore, I want to explore the implications of climate variability on these relationships. To this end, I study the factors that affect survival by using models that relate the physiology and behavior of individuals to population dynamics. I also use models to understand how individual behavior and the physical environment interact. The goal of my research is to understand the fundamental biological-physical mechanisms controlling populations of marine organisms, thereby providing a sound scientific basis to inform decisions in ecosystem management.

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Dave Rundio
Phone: (831) 420-3985
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: dave.rundio@noaa.gov

My research focuses on the freshwater biology of anadromous salmonids, primarily in the areas of food web ecology and population dynamics. I have been working most recently on populations of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in small basins on the Big Sur coast, where I have investigated seasonal patterns in prey availability and diet, connections between stream and riparian food webs, and spatial variation in stream communities and steelhead diets in relation to habitat characteristics. I am also part of a team conducting an intensive study of the population dynamics of steelhead in the Big Creek basin in which we are trying to understand how life-history diversity (i.e., residency and anadromy) affects population dynamics and resilience.

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David A. Boughton
Ecologist
Phone: (831) 420-3920
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: david.boughton@noaa.gov

- Ecology and evolution of southern- and central-coast California steelhead

- Population and metapopulation dynamics

- Processes controlling habitat dynamics at intermediate and broad scales, especially in arid and montane systems

- River restoration

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David D. Huff
Assistant Project Scientist
Phone: (831) 420-3927
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: david.huff@noaa.gov

Quantitative Ecology: autecological habitat models and community composition models

Integrating hypotheses and experiments with management to improve conservation decisions

Physical habitat influences on fish behavior and distribution in freshwater and marine systems

Reintroduction biology: local adaptation, outbreeding depression, and genetic diversity

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Doug Jackson
Phone: (831) 420-3905
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: doug.jackson@noaa.gov

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Eric Danner
Ecologist
Phone: (831) 420-3917
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: eric.danner@noaa.gov

I am interested in spatial patterns in ecology. My research combines remote sensing and field methods to better understand how physical processes affect the spatiotemporal dynamics of anadromous fish populations. Along with members of the Landscape Ecology Team I am currently developing a regional model for estimating stream temperatures using dynamic remote sensing data, climate data, and static bio- and geophysical data.

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Flora Cordoleani
Assistant Project Scientist
Phone: (831) 420-3963
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: flora.cordoleani@noaa.gov

My research area focuses on the study of marine biological systems through the use of mathematical models and statistical tools.

I am globally interested in understanding the combined effects of human and/or environmental forcing and biological interactions on the dynamics of marine populations and ecosystems.

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Heidi Fish
Phone: (831) 420-3913
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: heidi.fish@noaa.gov

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Isaac Schroeder
Phone:
Fax:
E-mail: isaac.schroeder@noaa.gov

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Ivy Lurz
Student Assistant
Phone:
Fax:
E-mail:

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Kerrie Pipal
Phone: (831) 420-3935
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: kerrie.pipal@noaa.gov

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Lea Bond
Laboratory Assistant
Phone: (831) 420-3918
Fax:
E-mail: lea.bond@noaa.gov

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Lee Harrison
Phone: (831) 420-3663
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: lee.harrison@noaa.gov

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Mark Henderson
Phone: (831) 420-3926
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: mark.henderson@noaa.gov

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Maya Friedman
Phone:
Fax:
E-mail: maya.friedman@noaa.gov

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Peter Dudley
Postdoctoral Scholar
Phone:
Fax:
E-mail: peter.dudley@noaa.gov

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Sara John
Phone: (831) 420-3916
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: sara.john@noaa.gov

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Thomas Williams
Phone: (831) 420-3912
Fax: (831) 420-3977
E-mail: tommy.williams@noaa.gov

I am interested in the ecology of Pacific salmon and trout and how populations track changes in the environment. This interest relates to how populations (or individuals, group of populations, ESU, species, community) persist and how constraints on the ability of fish to track change limit the ability of the organizational unit to persist.

My current field research focuses on steelhead populations in small stream systems along the Big Sur coast of California. Of particular interest are the dynamics of the local population(s), anadromy versus non-anadromy within basins, and interaction among adjacent basins that allows the O. mykiss populations in this region of the California coast to track changes in the environment. Various field techniques being used include PIT tagging (mobile and fixed antenna), mark-recapture, genetics, and age/growth analysis.

Additional research interests include development of monitoring approaches for Pacific salmonids, understanding fish–habitat associations, understanding population response to changes in habitat, and coastal cutthroat trout.

Other activities include serving and chairing technical recovery teams and biological review teams for Pacific salmonids and serving as science liaison between the Fisheries Ecology Division of SWFSC and the NMFS West Coast Region on issues related to Pacific salmonids.

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